offend


offend
offend, outrage, affront, insult mean to cause vexation or resentment or damage to self-respect.
One offends by displeasing another, by hurting his feelings, or by violating his sense of what is proper or fitting
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if the First Amendment means anything, it means that a man cannot be sent to prison merely for distributing publications which offend a judge's esthetic sensibilities— Potter Stewart

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fangless perceptions which will please the conservative power and delight the liberal power, offend no one— Mailer

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knew that he had offended his father but guilt would have been too exact a word for the pain and uneasiness he felt— Cheever

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One outrages by offending another past endurance, or by offending his pride or his sense of justice or honor
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her power to make him do things which outraged all his upbringing— Sackville-West

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listened to the beginning of the uproar, the shrill cries of the ladies and the outraged unbelieving exclamations of the men— Dahl

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"Grief of two years' standing is only a bad habit." Alice started, outraged. Her mother's grief was sacred to her— Shaw

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One affronts who, either with an intent to offend or with deliberate indifference to civility or cour-tesy, humiliates or dishonors a person and arouses his deep resentment
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a moral, sensible, and well-bred man will not affront me, and no other can— Cowper

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One insults who wantonly and insolently offends another so as to cause him humiliation or shame
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you can annoy, you can insult, you cannot move meMeredith

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he would insult them flagrantly; he would fling hrs hands in the air and thunder at their ignorance— Auchincloss

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Analogous words: *annoy, vex, irk, bother: exasperate, nettle, irritate: pique, *provoke, excite: chafe, fret, gall (see ABRADE)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Offend — Of*fend, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Offended}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Offending}.] [OF. offendre, L. offendere, offensum; ob (see {Ob }) + fendere (in comp.) to thrust, dash. See {Defend}.] 1. To strike against; to attack; to assail. [Obs.] Sir P. Sidney.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • offend — of‧fend [əˈfend] verb 1. [intransitive] LAW to do something that is a crime: • What can be done to stop criminals offending again? 2. [intransitive, transitive] to make someone angry or upset: • The advertisement was never intended to offend… …   Financial and business terms

  • Offend — Of*fend , v. i. 1. To transgress the moral or divine law; to commit a crime; to stumble; to sin. [1913 Webster] Whosoever shall keep the whole law, and yet offend in one point, he is guilty of all. James ii. 10. [1913 Webster] If it be a sin to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • offend — I (insult) verb abuse, affront, anger, annoy, be discourteous, be impolite, chagrin, displease, distress, disturb, embarrass, enrage, gall, horrify, hurt, incense, inflame, infuriate, injure, irk, irritate, laedere, madden, make angry, mortify,… …   Law dictionary

  • offend — [ə fend′] vi. [ME offenden < OFr offendre < L offendere, to strike against < ob (see OB ) + fendere, to hit, strike: see DEFEND] 1. to break a law, religious commandment, etc.; commit a sin or crime 2. to create resentment, anger, or… …   English World dictionary

  • offend — (v.) early 14c., to sin against (someone), from O.Fr. offendre, from L. offendere strike against, stumble, commit a fault, displease, from ob against + fendere to strike (found only in compounds). Meaning to violate (a law), to make a moral false …   Etymology dictionary

  • offend — [v] displease, insult affront, aggrieve, anger, annoy, antagonize, be disagreeable, disgruntle, disgust, disoblige, distress, disturb, exasperate, fret, gall, horrify, hurt, irritate, jar, miff, nauseate, nettle, outrage, pain, pique, provoke,… …   New thesaurus

  • offend — ► VERB 1) cause to feel hurt or resentful. 2) be displeasing to. 3) commit an act that is illegal or that goes against an accepted principle. DERIVATIVES offender noun. ORIGIN Latin offendere strike against …   English terms dictionary

  • offend — of|fend [əˈfend] v [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: offendre, from Latin offendere to strike against, offend ] 1.) [I and T] to make someone angry or upset by doing or saying something that they think is rude, unkind etc ▪ His remarks… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • offend — verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French offendre, from Latin offendere to strike against, offend, from ob against + fendere to strike more at ob , defend Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. a. to transgress the moral or divine law ; …   New Collegiate Dictionary